Tuesday, October 4, 2022

Parkinson’s Disease Stages Dementia

How Is Age Related To Pdd

Parkinson’s Dementia

Both PD and PDD are more common with increasing age. Most people with PD start having movement symptoms between ages 50 and 85, although some people have shown signs earlier. Up to 80% of people with PD eventually develop dementia. The average time from onset of movement problems to the development of dementia is about 10 years.

Diagnosis Of Probable Pdd

A diagnosis of probable PDD was made according to the Movement Disorder Society Level 1 criteria., Probable PDD was diagnosed when all the following five criteria were satisfied:

  • Diagnosis of PD according to United Kingdom Parkinsons Disease Society Brain Bank Criteria.

  • The development of PD prior to the onset of dementia: This information was gathered by clinicians involved in assessing participants.

  • PD associated with a decreased global cognitive efficiency: This was defined by a cut of score of 25 on the Mini Mental Status Examination .

  • Cognitive deficiency severe enough to impair daily life: The foundation of a PDD diagnosis is that the cognitive decline contributes to functional impairments most commonly observed in the activities of daily living . In the UK clinics, this was defined by the Clinical Impression of Severity Index for Parkinsons Disease . The cognitive status scale of this tool assesses the impact of cognitive decline on ADLs. The scale is scored 06, with 4 or higher suggesting that help is needed for ADLs, including help with basic daily activities. As such, any patient scoring 4 or higher met this criterion. In the Australian clinic, item 1.1 of the MDS-UPDRS was used. The scale is scored between 0 and 4 with a score of 2 or higher suggesting help is needed for ADLs, even if only minimal. As such, any patient scoring 2 or higher met this criterion.

  • Conceptualization Of The Diseases Needs And Interventions

    Both dementia and PD are incurable and progressive diseases with often complex problems and needs, for which tailored interventions are available . For dementia, experts agree that recognizing its eventual terminal nature is the basis for anticipating future problems and an impetus to the provision of adequate palliative care . Some advocate advanced dementia to be a terminal disease to support eligibility for palliative care. However, as about half of dementia patients never reach an advanced stage , it may be a late trigger to initiate palliative care. There is no consensus, however, at which stage palliative care in dementia should start .

    Table 2. Conceptualization of the disease, needs of patients and family caregivers, and interventions.

    For PD there are no curative treatments either, but the success of dopaminergic replacement therapy and deep brain stimulation has enabled the majority of patients to live independently with a relatively low symptom burden for the first 10 years after diagnosis-when they live up to a decade . This may contribute to PD generally not being recognized as an illness for which a palliative approach may be helpful . A US patient and caregivers council recommends palliative care to be available from diagnosis of PD . This is also the ideal of the European Parkinson’s Disease Association although they emphasize that when to start palliative care is an individual decision.

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    Stage : Moderately Severe Dementia

    When the patient begins to forget the names of their children, spouse, or primary caregivers, they are most likely entering stage 6 of dementia and will need full time care. In the sixth stage, patients are generally unaware of their surroundings, cannot recall recent events, and have skewed memories of their personal past. Caregivers and loved ones should watch for:

    • Delusional behavior

    Parkinson’s Disease Dementia Surgery And Gene Therapy

    Pin by Sung Song on Parkinson
    • Great strides have been made in the surgical treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Several different procedures are now available, and they are successful in many patients in relieving movement symptoms. Unfortunately, surgery has no effect on cognitive symptoms. In fact, most people with dementia are not candidates for surgery.
    • Gene therapy is in its infancy there are ongoing human and animal trials with various methods to insert genes into neuronal cells to reduce or stop Parkinson’s disease symptoms by causing cells to produce dopamine coded by the newly inserted genes. Early results with the treatment termed ProSavin are encouraging. However, it is not clear if such therapy could prevent or reverse Parkinson’s disease dementia.

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    When To Seek Hospice Care

    When you or your loved one have a life expectancy of six months or less, you become eligible for hospice care a type of comfort care provided at the end of life for someone living with end-stage Parkinsons disease. Hospice provides extra support so your loved one can live as comfortably as possible.

    If you have experienced a significant decline in your ability to move, speak, or participate in activities of daily living without caregiver assistance, its time to speak with a hospice professional.

    Read more: What is hospice care?

    Some of the things that determine whether your loved one with end-stage Parkinsons is eligible for hospice include: difficulty breathing, bed bound, unintelligible speech, inability to eat or drink sufficiently, and/or complications including pneumonia or sepsis.

    If you live in South Jersey, our nurse care coordinator can answer your questions and decide if your loved one is ready for hospice care. Call us 24/7 at 229-8183.

    The 5 Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

    Getting older is underrated by most. Its a joyful experience to sit back, relax and watch the people in your life grow up, have kids of their own and flourish. Age can be a beautiful thing, even as our bodies begin to slow down. We spoke with David Shprecher, DO, movement disorders director at Banner Sun Health Research Institute about a well-known illness which afflicts as many as 2% of people older than 65, Parkinsons Disease.

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    What Is The Self

    Protein in the diet may affect the absorption of levodopa, the major medication used to treat Parkinson’s disease. Fluctuations in the level of levodopa may worsen some behavioral and cognitive symptoms. A low-protein diet may reduce fluctuations in dopamine levels. In some patients with these fluctuations, dietary changes can improve symptoms. However, it is important to ensure that the person is getting adequate calories and other nutrients.

    People with Parkinson’s disease should remain as active as possible. Physical therapy helps the person maintain mobility.

    In general, people with Parkinson’s disease plus dementia should no longer drive vehicles. Movement problems may prevent quick reactions in hazardous driving situations. Certain medications, especially those given to treat symptoms of dementia, may make them less alert. However, this should be determined on an individual basis and in compliance with the laws of the state.

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    Behavioral And Mood Symptoms Of Lewy Body Dementia

    Carol The Caregiver – Parkinson’s dementia

    Changes in behavior and mood are possible in LBD and may worsen as the persons thinking abilities decline. These changes may include:

    • Depression
    • Apathy, or a lack of interest in normal daily activities or events and less social interaction
    • Anxiety and related behaviors, such as asking the same questions over and over or being angry or fearful when a loved one is not present
    • Agitation, or restlessness, and related behaviors, such as pacing, hand wringing, an inability to get settled, constant repeating of words or phrases, or irritability
    • Delusions, or strongly held false beliefs or opinions not based on evidence. For example, a person may think his or her spouse is having an affair or that relatives long dead are still living.
    • Paranoia, or an extreme, irrational distrust of others, such as suspicion that people are taking or hiding things

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    Dementia With Lewy Bodies And Parkinson Disease Dementia

    , MD, PhD, Department of Neurology, University of Mississippi Medical Center

    Dementia with Lewy bodiesParkinson disease dementia

    Dementia is chronic, global, usually irreversible deterioration of cognition.

    Dementia with Lewy bodies is the 3rd most common dementia. Age of onset is typically > 60.

    Lewy bodies are spherical, eosinophilic, neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions composed of aggregates of alpha-synuclein, a synaptic protein. They occur in the cortex of some patients who have dementia with Lewy bodies. Neurotransmitter levels and neuronal pathways between the striatum and the neocortex are abnormal.

    Lewy bodies also occur in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson disease, and dementia may develop late in the disease. About 40% of patients with Parkinson disease develop Parkinson disease dementia, usually after age 70 and about 10 to 15 years after Parkinson disease has been diagnosed.

    Because Lewy bodies occur in dementia with Lewy bodies and in Parkinson disease dementia, some experts think that the two disorders may be part of a more generalized synucleinopathy affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems. Lewy bodies sometimes occur in patients with Alzheimer disease, and patients with dementia with Lewy bodies may have neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson disease, and Alzheimer disease overlap considerably. Further research is needed to clarify the relationships among them.

    What Is Needed For A Parkinson’s Disease Dementia Diagnosis

    There is no definitive medical test that confirms cognitive decline or dementia in Parkinson’s disease. The most accurate way to measure cognitive decline is through neuropsychological testing.

    • The testing involves answering questions and performing tasks that have been carefully designed for this purpose. It is carried out by a specialist in this kind of testing.
    • Neuropsychological testing addresses the individual’s appearance, mood, anxiety level, and experience of delusions or hallucinations.
    • It assesses cognitive abilities such as memory, attention, orientation to time and place, use of language, and abilities to carry out various tasks and follow instructions.
    • Reasoning, abstract thinking, and problem solving are tested.
    • Neuropsychological testing gives a more accurate diagnosis of the problems and thus can help in treatment planning.
    • The tests are repeated periodically to see how well treatment is working and check for new problems.

    Imaging studies: Generally, brain scans such as CT scan and MRI are of little use in diagnosing dementia in people with Parkinson’s disease. Positron emission tomographic scan may help distinguish dementia from depression and similar conditions in Parkinson’s disease.

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    Managing The Effects Of Parkinsons Disease

    Currently there is no cure for Parkinsons disease but UK and international research is ongoing.

    With Parkinsons disease the interventions are focused on support, management of the changes, working with the person and their family to ensure they can live as well as possible with the condition. The physical effects of Parkinsons disease can be managed by:

    • adapting the home environment so any trip hazards are removed and risks minimised
    • a referral to Speech and Language Therapy if there are speech or swallowing problems
    • a referral to a physiotherapist if there are movement issues
    • a referral to an occupational therapist for aids and devices that may help around the house

    If the person with Parkinsons has significant communication or cognitive issues they can be reduced by:

    • reviewing the medication given for Parkinsons as this may be worsening the cognitive symptoms
    • speaking slowly and clearly if understanding and thought processes are slowed
    • reducing distractions
    • giving time for communication it may take longer to respond
    • asking questions to narrow down the answer, give choices or use yes/no cards or picture cards the person may have word finding difficulties as well as needing longer to respond
    • using a mobile phone, tablet or electronic communication aid
    • avoid unfamiliar or noisy places as they can cause distress
    • providing a routine and activities that the person enjoys and feels comfortable with

    Preventing And Delaying Cognitive Change

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    To overcome the cognitive changes linked to Parkinsons, it is recommended that you keep as active and stimulated as possible – physically, mentally and socially. It is important to stimulate all the different parts of the brain. Some useful tips include:

    • Undertake regular exercise
    • Complete simple arithmetic and crosswords
    • Listen to and play music
    • Participate in a social group
    • Do volunteer work
    • Maintain paid employment if possible
    • Learn new skills

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    What Is Parkinson Disease

    Parkinson disease is a movement disorder. It can cause the muscles to tighten and become rigid This makes it hard to walk and do other daily activities. People with Parkinsons disease also have tremors and may develop cognitive problems, including memory loss and dementia.

    Parkinson disease is most common in people who are older than 50. The average age at which it occurs is 60. But some younger people may also get Parkinson disease. When it affects someone younger than age 50, it’s called early-onset Parkinson disease. You may be more likely to get early-onset Parkinson disease if someone in your family has it. The older you are, the greater your risk of developing Parkinson disease. It’s also much more common in men than in women.

    Parkinson disease is a chronic and progressive disease. It doesn’t go away and continues to get worse over time.

    Parkinsons And Lewy Body Disease

    Lewy body disease occurs when there is an abnormal build-up of a protein called alphasynuclein in the brain. Depending on where the proteins accumulate, Lewy body disease can lead to impairments in movement, thinking and behaviour.

    Lewy body disease includes three overlapping disorders:

    • Dementia with Lewy bodies
    • Parkinsons disease dementia

    This overlap results in the disease being called a spectrum disease.

    In people with Parkinsons a large number of Lewy bodies appear in an area of the brain known as the substantia nigra. This area of the brain is responsible for movement, so the Lewy bodies are likely to cause impairments in movement.

    Some people may go on to develop dementia with Lewy bodies. In this form of the disease, the clumps of protein occur in the cortex . This part of the brain is responsible for many cognitive processes, so the Lewy bodies are likely to result in cognitive impairments like those described under the heading above. It can result in symptoms similar to those seen in Alzheimers.

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    How Can We Manage Hallucinations

    It may not be necessary to treat all hallucinations of a person with PDD. Hallucinations are often harmless, and it is okay to allow them to happen, as long as they are not disruptive or upsetting to the person or surroundings. Sometimes, recognizing the hallucination and then switching the topic might be an efficient way of handling frustrations that occur because of a hallucination. If hallucinations need medical treatment, your provider may be able to discuss and suggest some options. However, many of the medications used to treat hallucinations may make movement symptoms worse.

    What Are The Symptoms Of End

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    Stage four for Parkinsons disease is often called advanced Parkinsons disease because people in this stage experience severe and incapacitating symptoms. This is when medication doesnt help as much and serious disabilities set in.

    Theres an increased severity in:

    • How you speak a softer voice that trails off.
    • Falling and trouble with balance and coordination.
    • Freezing a sudden, but temporary inability to move, when you start to walk or change direction.
    • Moving without assistance or a wheelchair.
    • Other symptoms such as constipation, depression, loss of smell, low blood pressure when going to stand up, pain, and sleep issues.

    Many times someone with advanced PD cant live on their own and needs help with daily tasks.

    Stage five is the final stage of Parkinsons, and assistance will be needed in all areas of daily life as motor skills are seriously impaired. You may:

    • Experience stiffness in your legs. It may make it impossible to walk or stand without help.
    • Need a wheelchair at all times or are bedridden.
    • Need round-the-clock nursing care for all activities.
    • Experience hallucinations and delusions.

    As Parkinsons disease progresses into these advanced stages, its symptoms can often become increasingly difficult to manage. Whether you or your loved one with end-stage Parkinsons lives at home, in an assisted living facility or a nursing home, hospice services can optimize your quality of life and that of your family members as well.

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    How Is Parkinson Disease Treated

    Parkinson disease can’t be cured. But there are different therapies that can help control symptoms. Many of the medicines used to treat Parkinson disease help to offset the loss of the chemical dopamine in the brain. Most of these medicines help manage symptoms quite successfully.

    A procedure called deep brain stimulation may also be used to treat Parkinson disease. It sends electrical impulses into the brain to help control tremors and twitching movements. Some people may need surgery to manage Parkinson disease symptoms. Surgery may involve destroying small areas of brain tissue responsible for the symptoms. However, these surgeries are rarely done since deep brain stimulation is now available.

    What Causes Parkinson’s Disease Dementia

    Doctors don’t yet know the exact cause of Parkinson’s disease dementia, but they think it has to do with an accumulation of a protein called alpha-synuclein. When it builds up in the brain, it can create clumps called “Lewy bodies” in nerve cells, causing them to die.

    The death of those cells usually results in the motor symptoms typically associated with Parkinson’s disease. As Parkinson’s disease progresses, those Lewy bodies may eventually damage the brain and cause problems with memory and thinking.

    While many people with Parkinson’s disease experience cognitive changes, not all of them will go on to develop dementia. It’s estimated that between 50% and 80% of individuals with the disease eventually develop Parkinson’s disease dementia, usually in the later stages of the disease.

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    Lewy Body Dementia Research

    Many avenues of research are being explored to improve our understanding of LBD. Some researchers are working to identify the specific differences in the brain between the two types of LBD. Others are looking at the disease’s underlying biology, genetics, and environmental risk factors. Still other scientists are trying to identify biomarkers , improve screening tests to aid diagnosis, and research new treatments.

    Scientists hope that new knowledge about LBD will one day lead to more effective treatments and even ways to cure and prevent the disorder. Until then, researchers need volunteers with and without LBD for clinical studies.

    NIH and other groups help people learn about clinical trials and studies and find research opportunities near them. Visit the following websites for details:

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