Monday, September 26, 2022

Latest News On Parkinson’s Disease Treatment

Funded By Leading Charities

Parkinson’s Disease: Latest Treatments

Parkinsons UK and The Michael J. Fox Foundation , two leading charities have raised £1.5m to fund the phase 2 clinical trial, which is being sponsored by the biopharmaceutical company Neurolixis.

Dr Arthur Roach, Director of Research at Parkinsons UK, said: Were pleased to be supporting this study which aims to deliver a treatment that is desperately needed by many people living with Parkinsons. Its great that recruitment is now underway as this milestone brings us one step closer to results which could reveal an important new therapy for the millions living with this condition around the world.

The Next Generation Of Trials

Studer was part of the initial studies involving fetal tissue in the 1980s and 1990s, and knew from the start that the work was more of a proof of principle than a solution for people with Parkinsons. For me it was clear that a fetal transplant isnt a long-term solution because of ethical, legal and practical issues. Because this procedure requires 4 to 12 fetuses per patient, there was no way they could treat thousands, let alone tens of thousands, of people that way. Instead, Studer turned to stem cells.

Immunosuppression is a particularly important element of BlueRocks approach, because it relies on a single cell line that cannot be adjusted to more closely resemble the recipients own tissues. A group led by stem-cell scientist and neurosurgeon Jun Takahashi at Kyoto University in Japan is attempting to provoke a lesser immune response by pairing transplant recipients with cells that are less likely to be rejected. The researchers are using cell-surface proteins, called major histocompatibility complexes , that are recognized by the adaptive immune system and can have varying levels of compatibility from one person to another. Rather than using frozen cell lines, Takahashi and his colleagues are creating a fresh batch of MHC-matched cells for each transplant.

Turning Off The Switch

Parkinsons disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by the death of dopamine-producing cells in the brain. More than 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinsons disease, including more than 80,000 Australians.

Currently there are no approved drugs that can slow or stop the progression of Parkinsons disease, with available therapies only able to treat and alleviate symptoms.

PhD student and first author Zhong Yan Gan said the research provided an unprecedented view of a protein called PINK1, known to play a critical role in early onset Parkinsons disease.

Many papers from laboratories around the world including ours have captured snapshots of the PINK1 protein. However, the differences in these snapshots has in some ways fuelled confusion about the protein and its structure, Mr Gan said.

What we have been able to do is to take a series of snapshots of the protein ourselves and stitch them together to make a live action movie that reveals the entire activation process of PINK1. We were then able to reconcile why all these previous structural images were different they were snapshots taken at different moments in time as this protein was activated to perform its function in the cell.

Read Also: Can Chemo Cause Parkinson’s Disease

Are Scientists Homing In On A Cure For Parkinson’s Disease

by University of Bath

A molecule that shows promise in preventing Parkinson’s disease has been refined by scientists at the University of Bath in the UK, and has the potential to be developed into a drug to treat the deadly neurodegenerative disease.

Professor Jody Mason, who led the research from the Department of Biology and Biochemistry at Bath, said: “A lot of work still needs to happen, but this molecule has the potential to be a pre-cursor to a drug. Today there are only medicines to treat the symptoms of Parkinson’swe hope to develop a drug that can return people to good health even before symptoms develop.”

Parkinson’s Disease is characterized by a specific protein in human cells ‘misfolding’, where it becomes aggregated and malfunctions. The proteinalpha-synuclein is abundant in all human brains. After misfolding, it accumulates in large masses, known as Lewy bodies. These masses consist of S aggregates that are toxic to dopamine-producing brain cells, causing them to die. It is this drop in dopamine signaling that triggers the symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease, as the signals transmitting from the brain to the body become noisy, leading to the distinctive tremors seen in sufferers.

This research also has implications for Alzheimer’s disease, Type 2 diabetes and other serious human diseases where symptoms are triggered by protein misfolding.

The research was published in Journal of Molecular Biology.

Explore further

What Are The Latest Approved Treatments For Parkinsons Disease

What Is The Latest Treatment For Parkinson

Several medicines have been approved for the treatment of Parkinsons disease. Here are some of the available medicines for Parkinsons disease:

Nuplazid 3,4

Nuplazid was approved for the treatment of patients with hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinsons disease psychosis by the Food and Drugs Administration on April 29, 2016. On December 3, 2020 The approved an update to the prescribing information for Nuplazid that will allow the medication to be taken more easily by Parkinsons patients who have difficulty swallowing.

Ongentys 5,6

Ongentys is a medication used for the treatment of Parkinson disease. It is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with Parkinson disease. It is used as an add-on to levodopa/DOPA decarboxylase inhibitors in patients who are having fluctuations in the control of their condition.

Opicapone was approved for treating patients with Parkinsons Disease as an add-on to levodopa/DOPA decarboxylase inhibitors in patients who are having fluctuations in the control of their condition by the European Medicines Agency on June 24, 2016 and by the Food and Drug Administration on April 24, 2020.

Nourianz/Nouriast 7,8,9

Nourianz/Nouriast was approved by the Food and Drug Administration , USA, on August 27, 2019 and by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency , Japan, in June 2013.

Inbrija 10,11,12

Recommended Reading: First Signs Of Parkinson’s Disease Uk

Parkinson’s Protein Blueprint Could Help Fast

by Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research

Researchers have solved a decade-long mystery about a critical protein linked to Parkinson’s disease that could help to fast-track treatments for the incurable disease.

The research, published in Nature, has for the first time produced a ‘live action’ view of the protein, called PINK1, in exquisite molecular detail.

The discovery explains how the protein is activated in the cell, where it is responsible for initiating the removal and replacement of damaged mitochondria. When the protein is not working correctly, it can starve brain cells of energy, causing them to malfunction andin the long termdie, as happens to dopamine-producing cells in Parkinson’s disease.

The discovery is the culmination of a project spanning eight years and provides the first detailed blueprint for the discovery and development of therapeutic agents that could help to slow or even stop the progression of Parkinson’s disease.

Led by Ph.D. student Mr Zhong Yan Gan and Professor David Komander, the multidisciplinary team at WEHI used innovative cryo-electron microscopy facilities and research to make the discovery.

Turning off the switch

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by the death of dopamine-producing cells in the brain. More than 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson’s disease, including more than 80,000 Australians.

Drug discovery potential

World-class facilities

Explore further

Latest Treatments For Parkinsons Disease

Researchers still have much to learn about Parkinsons disease. As researchers continue to work hard in the fight against this disease, the lessons they learn may lead to new, innovative treatments.

Parkinsons disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra area of the brain, advises the Parkinsons Foundation. Even though the disease itself is not fatal, PD is a serious condition one which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention rates as the 14th most common cause of death in the United States due to the diseases related complications.

PD symptoms affect autonomous functions and the ability to move limbs. The Mayo Clinic notes that most people with PD may show little or no expression, speech may become slurred, arms may not swing when one walks, and stiffness and gait issues may become apparent. PD can affect balance and posture as well.

There is no cure for PD, but there are many different treatments that can slow its progress and reduce symptoms.

WebMD says new treatments for PD give individuals continued hope. Heres a look at some of the potential options.

Stem cell usagetem cells can turn into any type of cell, and there is hope that they can transform into the dopamine-producing neurons used to treat PD. But there is increased risk of involuntary movement from too much dopamine with this treatment. Stem cell therapy also may present ethical and moral issues with some patients.

Signal Contributor

Recommended Reading: Parkinson’s Disease Drugs List

Fight Against Migraine Symposium 2018

In August 2018, Girish Nair was invited to speak at the Fight Against Migraines conference held in Melbourne. He is pictured here with Dr David Dodick, a world leader in the field of headache and migraine.

Former AFL player, Mark Mikan was diagnosed with Parkinsons disease in 2016. Until recently, he experienced debilitating tremors in his hands and feet. His symptoms have been greatly reduced since undergoing brain surgery. Find out about the operation using the latest in deep brain stimulation technology.

A new surgical technique lead by neurosurgeon Girish Nair is having a remarkable impact on the symptoms of Parkinsons disease. The new and improved deep brain stimulation therapy uses 3D printed equipment that is fitted to the patients head. This results in a faster, more accurate and ultimately less intimidating operation for the patient. Previously any patient undergoing deep brain stimulation would be secured to an operating table with a cumbersome head frame. They were often kept awake for the operation which lasted many hours making the treatment almost intolerable.

In a world first, stem cells have been injected into the brain of a Parkinsons disease sufferer as part of an experimental treatment in Melbourne.

Interviewees: Mr Girish Nair, Neurosurgeon & Dr Andrew Evans, Neurologist

Ch 9 Nine News 3pm & 4pm

Ch 9 National Nine News 6:14 pm

Ch7 Seven News 4:00 pm

SBS World News 6:30pm

Ch 10 TEN Eyewitness News 5:11 pm

ABC Radio The World Today

Neuroaxis In The Media

Trial of new treatment for Parkinson’s disease | 7.30

The highly skilled neurosurgeons at Neuroaxis are known around the world for being highly skilled in their field. Here you will find media coverage recognising the contribution of our neurosurgeons to find new innovative ways of treating patients.

While we are dedicated to furthering medical research and being part of breakthrough, pioneering treatments, we also care deeply about our community of patients. Youll find details of our charity commitments to help support the conditions many of our patients suffer from.

Recommended Reading: Fitflop Shoes For Parkinson’s

What We Know So Far

  • We’ve uncovered clues to the causes and genetic involvement in Parkinson’s.
  • We’re figuring out the chain of events that leads to the damage and loss of brain cells.
  • We’re working to advance new treatments and therapies.
  • We’re exploring repurposing drugs to help manage some of the more distressing symptoms, like hallucinations and falls.
  • And we know that, although people with Parkinson’s share symptoms, each person’s experience of the condition and response to treatment is different.

Now, the science is ready for us to develop the new treatments and cure that people with Parkinson’s so desperately need.

Research takes time but if you have Parkinsons, you need better treatments now. Thats why weve launched the Parkinson’s Virtual Biotech to speed up the most promising potential treatments. The more we can invest, the sooner we’ll get there.

Cbd Trial To Treat Hallucinations In Parkinsons

Video content

Charles Ogilvie-Forbes is a volunteer in a clinical trial at Kings College Hospital, London.

  • Entertainment reporter

    Alex Echo has been forced to give up most of his painting work, but is now championing digital art.

  • Video caption: Billy Connolly: Challenges of Parkinson’s getting worseBilly Connolly: Challenges of Parkinson’s getting worse Article share tools
  • You May Like: Young Onset Parkinson’s Symptoms

    Organization Issues New Guideline For Treatment Of Early Parkinson’s Disease

    by American Academy of Neurology

    The American Academy of Neurology has issued a guideline providing recommendations for treating movement symptoms, called motor symptoms, in people with early Parkinson’s disease. The guideline is published in the November 15, 2021, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the AAN, and is endorsed by the Parkinson’s Foundation. This guideline updates recommendations on dopaminergic medications that were published in the 2002 AAN guideline on the initiation of treatment for Parkinson’s disease.

    Parkinson’s disease can progressively affect all movement including manual dexterity, speech, walking and balance due to a gradual reduction of a chemical in the brain called dopamine, a substance that helps control movement. Motor symptoms in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease include tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia, which is slowness of movement. To relieve these early symptoms, treatment options include dopaminergic medications, drugs that increase dopamine levels or mimic dopamine effects.

    The guideline recommends that neurologists should counsel people with early Parkinson’s disease on the benefits and risks of initial therapy of the following three treatment options: Levodopa, a drug that is converted into dopamine in the brain dopamine agonists, drugs that mimic the effects of dopamine and monoamine oxidase B inhibitors, drugs that prevent an enzyme called MAO-B from breaking down dopamine.

    Explore further

    What New Treatments Are Being Developed

    Is Protein Bad For Parkinson

    Thanks to the progress we’ve already made, new treatments are being tested in clinical trials that have the potential to slow, stop or even reverse Parkinson’s.

    These include:

    • stem cell therapies, which aim to use healthy, living cells to replace or repair the damage in the brains of people with Parkinson’s
    • gene therapies, which use the power of genetics to reprogramme cells and change their behaviour to help them stay healthy and work better for longer
    • growth factors , which are naturally occurring molecules that support the growth, development and survival of brain cells.

    And we’re developing treatments that aim to improve life with the condition, including new drugs that can reduce dyskinesia.

    You May Like: Can A Datscan Diagnose Parkinsons

    What Will A Cure For Parkinson’s Look Like

    Parkinson’s varies so much from person to person. There are over 40 symptoms of Parkinsons. Tremor. Pain. Hallucinations. Everyones experience is different.

    Because of this, there may not be a single ‘cure’.

    Instead we may need a range of different therapies to meet the needs of the individual and their specific form of the condition.

    This mix may include treatments, therapies and strategies that can:

    • slow or stop the progression of the condition
    • replace or repair lost or damaged brain cells
    • control and manage particular symptoms
    • diagnose Parkinson’s at the earliest possible stage.

    And this could involve medical treatments, such as drugs and surgical approaches, as well as lifestyle changes, for example to diet and exercise.

    Mickan Against Parkinsons Gala Dinner 2019

    At The Mickan against Parkinsons Adelaide, SA. Congratulations to Ms.Nassaris and the team at Adelaide Oval for putting this together .Thanks for inviting Mr Girish Nair as a speaker for the event to speak about his involvement in Mr. Mickans care as a treating Neurosurgeon

    Thanks for having Neuroaxis at this event celebrating a true Champion in footy and in the fight against Parkinsons. We are proud to be part of Marks Parkinson journey.

    Read Also: Is Parkinson’s Disease An Autoimmune Disease

    New Medications For Off Time

    A number of new medications approved recently are designed to reduce OFF time. These medications fall into two major categories:

    • Medications that lengthen the effect of a carbidopa/levodopa dose
    • Medications that are used as needed if medication effects wear off

    Well give specific examples below. In general, new medications that extend the length of a carbidopa/levodopa dose are used if OFF time is somewhat predictable and occurs prior to next dose. New medications that are used as needed are most beneficial when OFF time is not predictable.

    New medications that lengthen the effect of a dose of carbidopa/levodopa

    • Istradefylline is an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist which was approved in the US in 2019 as an add-on therapy to levodopa for treatment of OFF time in PD. Unlike many of the other medications, it has a novel mechanism of action and is the first medication in its class to be approved for PD. It acts on the adenosine receptor, which modulates the dopaminergic system, but is not directly dopaminergic. The drug was developed in Japan and underwent clinical trials both in Japan and in the US.
    • Opicapone is a catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitor that is taken once a day. It was approved in the US in 2020 as an add-on therapy to levodopa for motor fluctuations.

    New formulations of levodopa designed to be used as needed if medication effects wear off

    Other medications used as needed if medication effects wear off

    Important Points About The New Medications

    Breakthrough clinical trial could reverse symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease

    With multiple new medications available for the treatment of PD, there is more hope than ever that Parkinsons symptoms can be successfully managed for many years. A few things to consider:

    • For people whose symptoms are difficult to control, these new treatments are welcome additions to what was previously available and many people with PD have been using these new medications with significant benefit.
    • On the other hand, many of the newly-approved medications have the same mechanisms of action as older medications so they are not breaking new ground in treating symptoms.
    • In addition, for some people, the effect on symptoms may be mild or not substantial.

    These caveats may mean that your physician has not suggested a medication change for you. It is also important to note that despite all the new medications, carbidopa/levodopa remains the most potent medication to treat the motor symptoms of PD.

    If your doctor does choose to try one of the new options, there may be multiple paths that your doctor can take when contemplating a medication adjustment. Often trial and error is the only way to determine the best medication regimen for you, so you may need to practice some patience as you work together with your doctor to determine what works or doesnt work.

    You May Like: What Are The Most Common Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

    Popular Articles
    Related news