Tuesday, July 26, 2022

Can Parkinson’s Cause Weakness In The Legs

Cognitive And Psychiatric Symptoms

What Causes Muscle Weakness In The Legs? : One Man’s Recovery
  • depression and anxiety
  • mild cognitive impairment slight memory problems and problems with activities that require planning and organisation
  • dementia a group of symptoms, including more severe memory problems, personality changes, seeing things that are not there and believing things that are not true

What Are The Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

Symptoms of Parkinsons disease and the rate of decline vary widely from person to person. The most common symptoms include:

Other symptoms include:

  • Speech/vocal changes: Speech may be quick, become slurred or be soft in tone. You may hesitate before speaking. The pitch of your voice may become unchanged .
  • Handwriting changes: You handwriting may become smaller and more difficult to read.
  • Depression and anxiety.
  • Sleeping disturbances including disrupted sleep, acting out your dreams, and restless leg syndrome.
  • Pain, lack of interest , fatigue, change in weight, vision changes.
  • Low blood pressure.

Disc Bulges And Disc Herniations

Disc bulges and disc herniations in the low back commonly pinch nerves in the low back causing leg weakness. In particular, discs are gel-like cushions between the bones in the spine. When the discs in the low back get injured, they can bulge or burst out . If the disc bulge or disc herniation in the low back pinches the nerves, the leg muscles can become weak.

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Acpa And Stanford Resource Guide To Chronic Pain Management

This 213-page downloadable PDF is a comprehensive, integrated guide to medical, interventional, psychological/behavioral, pharmacologic, rehabilitative, complementary and integrative, and self-help strategies in the treatment of chronic pain. It covers general information compiled from multiple sources, is updated yearly and includes imbedded web links for certain medications and treatments and relevant internet sites of interest.

This questionnaire can help identify type of pain and determine whether someone should see a pain specialist.

Fatigue In Parkinsons Disease

Neurological conditions

Fatigue is a common but under-recognized problem for people with Parkinsons disease . Fatigue can be defined as an unpleasant sensation of lacking energy, making the performance of routine activities, physical or mental, a strain. People with PD may experience physical fatigue, mental fatigue, or both. Fatigue in PD is not the same as the feeling you might get at the end of a hard days work. It is not necessarily something that goes away with rest. When people with PD are asked about fatigue, they use phrases such as, I feel run down, I am out of energy, I am unable to do anything, I cant get motivated.

Fatigue in Parkinsons Brochure

No time to finish the article? Download the brochure as a PDF to take this information with you, or share with someone you know.

Fatigue is common in PD

Fatigue and Depression

There is a large overlap between fatigue and other problems in PD, especially depression and sleep disorders. People with fatigue are more likely to be depressed and people who are depressed are more likely to be fatigued, but there is nonetheless a large group of PD patients who are fatigued but not depressed. Depression in PD typically responds to antidepressant treatment, and depression-related fatigue may improve with such treatment.

Introducing an easier way to track your symptoms and manage your care.

Dont want to download the app? Use the non-mobile version here.

Fatigue and Sleep disorders

Causes of Fatigue

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Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

Because Parkinsons disease develops over time, there are various stages that help identify how symptoms have progressed and what should be expected next.

Generally, doctors follow a set of five stages as outlined below:

Stage 1

The beginning stage of Parkinsons disease sometimes doesnt show any signs at all. If symptoms are noticeable, theyre usually tremors and affect one side of the body. The symptoms usually dont affect your daily routine, but they should be taken seriously and brought to the attention of your doctor, if they havent already.

Stage 2

During this stage, the disease starts to affect your whole body. The tremors and stiffness cause routine activities to take a little longer to complete, and your overall movement starts to be affected. Your posture and facial expressions may should start to change, which can impact your ability to walk at a normal pace or communicate like you used to.

Stage 3

This stage features a worsening of all the symptoms that started to progressively deteriorate in stage 2, but you also start to experience a loss of balance and coordination, as well as how quick your reflexes are. As these symptoms start to come into the fold, people with the disease start to fall more, which can cause their own injuries and debilitations. Activities like getting out of bed, eating, and getting dressed start to get more difficult.

Stage 4

Stage 5

How Exercise Can Help

Research shows that regular exercise has significant benefits for Parkinsons patients. Since the disease affects flexibility, strength, and balance, patients are encouraged to use targeted exercise routines to manage the disease.

A study review published in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicinefound that exercise improves overall physical performance in Parkinsons patients. The authors concluded that future research should examine the long-term effects of exercise programs.

As a rock climber, I spend a lot of time pulling on jagged edges. Ive learned that its important to balance muscle growth with the opposite action. Ive integrated pushing into my routine to balance the pulling that I do on a rock wall. Focusing on both pushing and pulling helps my body to stay balanced and prevents injuries.

While I havent yet encountered a rock climber with Parkinsons, the same premise could apply. If Parkinsons causes constant muscle contractions, how can we encourage those muscles to extend and relax? Yoga emphasizes both strength and flexibility. And its possible to practice a routine at home. Starting a yoga practice might offer a solution to managing muscular changes.

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Can Parkinsons Disease Be Prevented

Unfortunately, no. Parkinsons disease is long-term disease that worsens over time. Although there is no way to prevent or cure the disease , medications may significantly relieve your symptoms. In some patients especially those with later-stage disease, surgery to improve symptoms may be an option.

Treating Fatigue In Parkinsons Disease

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There are currently few treatments available that directly alleviate fatigue, which can make it difficult to treat. However, people with PD who experience fatigue should talk to their doctor as changes in their current medications may help relieve fatigue. Complementary therapies, such as acupuncture or massage, may help improve symptoms of fatigue. In addition, there are several lifestyle approaches that can help manage fatigue, including:

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My Parkinson’s Story: Pain

This 10-minute video alternates between an interview with a man and and doctors. The man shares his experience with pain as a symptom of Parkinson’s disease. The doctors explain that pain is common in Parkinson’s disease, often due to rigidity or dystonia, which can be exacerbated by “off” periods. Pain caused by Parkinson’s symptoms can be relieved by Parkinson’s medications, exercise, DBS and botox injections. Pain is an invisible symptom that should be mentioned to your neurologist.

How Patients Feel About The Parkinsons

After coming in contact with many Parkinsons patients, we have realized that nothing can make you fall if you have the resilience and courage to fight with it. Patients describe their pain and discomfort as a frustration when they were diagnosed with this disease. A patient said that it felt as if the life completely drained out of my right arm from the elbow down” when tremors began.

Some patients added that it is correct to use Parkinsons paralysis as a term for the rigidity, unfamiliar pain and stiffness they felt in their arms and limbs muscles.

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Memory Or Thinking Problems

Having issues with thinking and processing things could mean your disease is progressing. Parkinsons is more than a movement disorder. The disease has a cognitive part as well, which means it can cause changes in the way your brain works.

During the final stage of the disease, some people may develop dementia or have hallucinations. However, hallucinations can also be a side effect of certain medications.

If you or your loved ones notice that youre getting unusually forgetful or easily confused, it might be a sign of advanced-stage Parkinsons.

The Critical Difference Between Sleepiness And Fatigue

Why This Parkinson

Fatigue is a physical or psychological feeling where people feel weary and exhausted and lacking energy. EDS is about needing and having the urge to sleep.

Fatigue is something that people can experience along with EDS however, people who experience fatigue on its ownthe feeling of being tired and out of energy do not also necessarily fall asleep when sedentary, as people who experience EDS often do.

It is estimated that EDS affects up to 50% to 75% of people living with Parkinsons and fatigue is estimated to affect 40% to 60%. Fatigue, however, is more likely to go undiagnosed.

Because the terms fatigue and sleepiness are so heavily linked, and sometimes used interchangeably, research has concluded that fatigue and EDS should be assessed separately in people with Parkinsons so that we can improve our understanding of their overlapping physiology.

With that knowledge, researchers from the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland designed a study to determine the overlap between fatigue and EDS and then associate them with other motor and non-motor symptoms as well as dopaminergic medication.

In their study of 88 outpatients, the researchers found that 72% experienced fatigue or EDS and just under half experienced both. Some of the key findings of the study include:

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What Is The Quality Of The Reviewed Studies

Overall, quality scores were mediocre for both non-intervention and intervention studies. The main points that studies scored low on were sample size justification, electrode placement procedures and signal processing techniques. Individuals with PD exhibit great heterogeneity and generally high inter- and intra- subject gait EMG variability necessitating greater sample sizes than for HOA. However, the median sample size was only twenty-two and no study in this review performed power analysis to justify their selection of participant number. Most studies included a greater proportion of males, reflecting the gender bias in PD although some studies did not specify gender. Gender differences in muscle activity during walking have previously been reported, indicating it is an important factor. Only four studies determined electrode location using validated guidelines such as the SENIAM guidelines. Identification of the optimal electrode site helps ensure the signals with higher signal to noise ratio are recorded from the selected muscle with minimal cross-talk from adjacent muscles.

Over half of the studies did not report any signal normalisation methods,,,,,,,,. Such normalisation is essential to allow comparisons of EMG between muscles, sessions and participants as factors such as thickness of adipose tissue, presence of oedema and number and orientation of muscle fibres will modify amplitude,. Excluding normalisation can invalidate subsequent results.

What Are The Different Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

Each person with Parkinsons disease experiences symptoms in in their own unique way. Not everyone experiences all symptoms of Parkinsons disease. You may not experience symptoms in the same order as others. Some people may have mild symptoms others may have intense symptoms. How quickly symptoms worsen also varies from individual to individual and is difficult to impossible to predict at the outset.

In general, the disease progresses from early stage to mid-stage to mid-late-stage to advanced stage. This is what typically occurs during each of these stages:

Early stage

Early symptoms of Parkinsons disease are usually mild and typically occur slowly and do not interfere with daily activities. Sometimes early symptoms are not easy to detect or you may think early symptoms are simply normal signs of aging. You may have fatigue or a general sense of uneasiness. You may feel a slight tremor or have difficulty standing.

Often, a family member or friend notices some of the subtle signs before you do. They may notice things like body stiffness or lack of normal movement slow or small handwriting, lack of expression in your face, or difficulty getting out of a chair.

Mid stage

Mid-late stage

Standing and walking are becoming more difficult and may require assistance with a walker. You may need full time help to continue to live at home.

Advanced stage

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Changes In Sleeping Patterns

As Parkinsons progresses, you can also develop problems with sleep patterns. These may not happen in the early stages, but can be noticeable later. You might wake up often in the middle of the night or sleep more during the day than you do at night.

Another common sleep disturbance for people with Parkinsons is rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This is when you start acting out your dreams in your sleep, such as verbally and physically, which can get uncomfortable if someone is sharing your bed. Dr. Rundle-Gonzalez says many times a bed partner will be the one to notice sleep problems.

REM sleep behavior disorder can also happen in people who dont have Parkinsons. However, if this isnt something youve dealt with before, its likely related to your disease. There are medications your doctor can prescribe to help you sleep comfortably through the night.

What Is Parkinsons Paralysis

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Parkinsons paralysis is a common term used by patients of Parkinsons disease and is generally referred as a result of loss of muscle function in the person who is suffering from Parkinsons disease. Paralysis is basically of two types i.e. complete or partial and can occur on either sides of the body.

Paralysis attack on the body can be widespread or can just occur in one area of the body. In many cases, Parkinsons disease leads to paralysis agitans, meaning complete weakness.

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Figuring Out Causes Of Fatigue

The first step in easing the fatigue associated with Parkinsons disease is to rule out other causes of tiredness, says Liana Rosenthal, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of clinical core at the Morris K. Udall Center Parkinsons Disease Research Center of Excellence. We evaluate patients to see if there are other things contributing to the fatigue besides their disease, she says.

Sometimes patients may be referred to a sleep specialist for an evaluation. That can help identify causes of tiredness, like sleep apnea. Rosenthal says: Our aim is to first treat any sleep issues, like insomnia, sleep apnea or other causes of poor sleep. Once we treat and address those issues, we can see if fatigue still persists.

Potentials Ways To Reduce Fatigue

  • Exercise. It may seem counterintuitive get moving if youre feeling fatigued however, the right kind and the right amount of exercise can significantly reduce fatigue. Experiment. Sometimes just getting out the door for a walk in the fresh air can reduce fatigue.
  • Talk to your doctor if you think you may be depressed. Its possible that an anti-depressant could reduce fatigue.
  • Plan your time. Identify when you tend to have the most energy throughout the day and plan to get your most important jobs done then.
  • Be realistic, but still do something. If youre feeling extra exhausted on a certain day, dont put pressure on yourself to accomplish everything you planned. Do somethingbecause accomplishing something will give you an energy boost but be realistic about what youre capable of doing.
  • Delegate. Its not easy. You may have concerns about being a burden to others. Most people will be thrilled to help. Let them.
  • Organize and declutter. Opening up spacephysically, emotionally, mentally and logisticallycan help you reduce stress and as a result reduce feelings of fatigue.
  • Connect with others. We know that when you feel wiped out that the last thing you want to do is attend a support group meeting or event, but connecting with others in a positive way has the potential to not only make you feel supported and encouraged and loved, but it may very well give you the exact bump in energy that you need.

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Pain In Parkinsons Disease: A Spotlight On Women

This 2-page interview with neurologist, Dr. Jori E. Fleisher, discusses pain in Parkinsons disease with some interesting statistics about women and pain. Dr. Fleisher outlines the 4 primary types of pain in PD, how depression interferes with pain management, the role of exercise and medications in pain management as well as alternative therapies.

Osteoarthritis Pinch Nerves Causing Weak Legs

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Severe osteoarthritis with bone spurs in the spine can also pinch nerves causing leg weakness. In osteoarthritis , the small spinal joints wear out and become painful and swollen. Like severe disc degeneration, bone spurs in severe OA take a long time to develop. Because disc degeneration and OA often occur together, nerves are more likely to get pinched.

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Pain Management In Patients With Parkinsons Disease: Challenges And Solutions

This review focuses on the diagnosis and management of Parkinson-related pain. It reviews the incidence and prevalence of PD, general pain and PD-related pain, the pathophysiological pathways of pain in PD, physiological pathways of pain relief, measurements of pain, clinical diagnosis of PD-related pain, and treatment strategies.

Data Analytical Considerations For Emg

  • Filtering and normalisation. Appropriate filtering techniques must be performed to ensure signals are physiological and not convoluted by noise. Normalisation techniques must be applied to each muscle for each individual to allow comparisons.

  • Parameter selection. Parameters should be selected that reflect underlying neural control systems, physiology and gait dysfunction. Spectral analysis, nonlinear analysis of variability, and factor analysis methods, such as nonnegative matrix factorisation, may indicate neurophysiological mechanisms. Relating EMG outcome to specific gait functions such as loading, push-off and swing is important for identifying targets for gait rehabilitation in PD.

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