Sunday, August 7, 2022

How Can I Tell If I Have Parkinson Disease

What Is The Prognosis And Life Expectancy For Parkinson’s Disease

Should I tell people I have Parkinson’s Disease?

    The severity of Parkinson’s disease symptoms and signs vary greatly from person to person, and it is not possible to predict how quickly the disease will progress.

    • Parkinson’s disease itself is not a fatal disease, and the average life expectancy is similar to that of people without the disease.
    • Secondary complications, such as pneumonia, falling-related injuries, and choking can lead to death.
    • Many treatment options can reduce some of the symptoms and prolong the quality of life.

    What Is The Outlook For Persons With Parkinsons Disease

    Although there is no cure or absolute evidence of ways to prevent Parkinsons disease, scientists are working hard to learn more about the disease and find innovative ways to better manage it, prevent it from progressing and ultimately curing it.

    Currently, you and your healthcare teams efforts are focused on medical management of your symptoms along with general health and lifestyle improvement recommendations . By identifying individual symptoms and adjusting the course of action based on changes in symptoms, most people with Parkinsons disease can live fulfilling lives.

    The future is hopeful. Some of the research underway includes:

    • Using stem cells to produce new neurons, which would produce dopamine.
    • Producing a dopamine-producing enzyme that is delivered to a gene in the brain that controls movement.
    • Using a naturally occurring human protein glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, GDNF to protect dopamine-releasing nerve cells.

    Many other investigations are underway too. Much has been learned, much progress has been made and additional discoveries are likely to come.

    Testing For Parkinsons Disease

    There is no lab or imaging test that is recommended or definitive for Parkinsons disease. However, in 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved an imaging scan called the DaTscan. This technique allows doctors to see detailed pictures of the brains dopamine system.

    A DaTscan involves an injection of a small amount of a radioactive drug and a machine called a single-photon emission computed tomography scanner, similar to an MRI.

    The drug binds to dopamine transmitters in the brain, showing where in the brain dopaminergic neurons are.

    The results of a DaTscan cant show that you have Parkinsons, but they can help your doctor confirm a diagnosis or rule out a Parkinsons mimic.

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    What Are The Treatments

    Currently there is no cure for Parkinsons disease.

    Symptoms can be mild in the early stages of the condition and people might not need immediate treatment. Your doctor and specialist will monitor your situation.

    There are several different types of drugs used to treat Parkinsons disease. Drug treatments are tailored to each individuals needs and are likely to involve a combination of different drugs. Your medication should be reviewed regularly. It is likely that, over time, changes will be made to the types of drugs you take and the doses you take each day.

    The main types of drug treatment for Parkinsons disease are:

    • drugs which replace dopamine
    • drugs which mimic the role of dopamine
    • drugs which inhibit the activity of acetylcholine
    • drugs which prevent the body breaking down dopamine
    • other drugs such as anti-sickness medication

    Everybody is affected differently by medication. The possible side effects of Parkinsons disease drugs include nausea , vomiting , tiredness and dizziness. Some people might experience confusion, nightmares and hallucinations. For some people, dopamine agonists have been linked to compulsive behaviour such as addictive gambling or hypersexuality .

    The effectiveness of the main drug treatment levodopa can wear off over time and its long-term use can cause some people to develop involuntary twisting or writhing movements of the arms, legs or face . To reduce the risk, doctors might delay the use of levodopa for younger people.

    There Are : : : : : Stages Of Parkinson’s Disease

    Can I Tell You About Parkinson

    There are five stages of Parkinson’s disease, described with the most commonly used Hoehn and Yahr scale: – Stage one: Symptoms such as tremors or shaking on one side of the body- Stage two: Tremors or shaking one or both sides of the body possible imbalance- Stage three: Noticeable balance impairment and slowing of motion- Stage four: Severe symptoms, disability patient likely needs assistance- Stage five: Patient may be bedridden or wheelchair bound needs constant care Another scale that may be used to describe symptoms of Parkinson’s disease is called the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale . It is a four-part scale that measures motor movement in PD: non-motor experiences of daily living, motor experiences of daily living, motor examination, and motor complications.

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    Accept What You Can No Longer Do

    Over time, it may seem as though you are losing your independence because you can no longer do all the things you once did. As these losses occur, you will probably go through the five stages of grief identified by Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross. They include denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Being aware of the issue or loss to which you are reacting will help you to move from one stage to another more easily.

    No matter what your symptoms are, motor or non-motor symptoms, dont let Parkinsons beat you!

    Exercise And Healthy Eating

    Regular exercise is particularly important in helping relieve muscle stiffness, improving your mood, and relieving stress.

    There are many activities you can do to help keep yourself fit, ranging from more active sports like tennis and cycling, to less strenuous activities such as walking, gardening and yoga.

    You should also try to eat a balanced diet containing all the food groups to give your body the nutrition it needs to stay healthy.

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    Signs Of Parkinsons Disease

    In 1817, Dr. James Parkinson published An Essay on the Shaking Palsy describing non-motor, as well as, motor symptoms of the illness that bears his name. Parkinsons is not just a movement disorder, explained Dr. Shprecher. Constipation, impaired sense of smell, and dream enactment can occur years before motor symptoms of Parkinsons. The latter, caused by a condition called REM sleep behavior disorder, is a very strong risk factor for both Parkinsons and dementia . This has prompted us to join a consortium of centers studying REM sleep behavior disorder.

    Increased Feelings Of Anxiety Or Depression

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    Anxiety and depression have been linked to Parkinsons. In addition to movement problems, the disease can also have an impact on your mental health. Its possible that changes in your emotional well-being can be a sign of changing physical health as well.

    If you are more anxious than usual, have lost interest in things, or feel a sense of hopelessness, talk to your doctor.

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    If Its Not Parkinsons Disease What Could It Be

    Here are some possibilities:

    Side effects of medication: Certain drugs used for mental illnesses like psychosis or major depression can bring on symptoms like the ones caused by Parkinsonâs disease. Anti-nausea drugs can, too, but they typically happen on both sides of your body at the same time. They usually go away a few weeks after you stop taking the medication.

    Essential tremor: This is a common movement disorder that causes shaking, most often in your hands or arms. Itâs more noticeable when youâre using them, like when you eat or write. Tremors caused by Parkinsonâs disease usually happen when youâre not moving.

    Progressive supranuclear palsy: People with this rare disease can have problems with balance, which may cause them to fall a lot. They donât tend to have tremors, but they do have blurry vision and issues with eye movement. These symptoms usually get worse faster than with Parkinson’s disease.

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus : This happens when a certain kind of fluid builds up in your brain and causes pressure. People with NPH usually have trouble walking, a loss of bladder control, and dementia.

    Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

    Parkinson’s disease has four main symptoms:

    • Tremor in hands, arms, legs, jaw, or head
    • Stiffness of the limbs and trunk
    • Slowness of movement
    • Impaired balance and coordination, sometimes leading to falls

    Other symptoms may include depression and other emotional changes difficulty swallowing, chewing, and speaking urinary problems or constipation skin problems and sleep disruptions.

    Symptoms of Parkinsons and the rate of progression differ among individuals. Sometimes people dismiss early symptoms of Parkinson’s as the effects of normal aging. In most cases, there are no medical tests to definitively detect the disease, so it can be difficult to diagnose accurately.

    Early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are subtle and occur gradually. For example, affected people may feel mild tremors or have difficulty getting out of a chair. They may notice that they speak too softly, or that their handwriting is slow and looks cramped or small. Friends or family members may be the first to notice changes in someone with early Parkinson’s. They may see that the person’s face lacks expression and animation, or that the person does not move an arm or leg normally.

    People with Parkinson’s often develop a parkinsonian gait that includes a tendency to lean forward, small quick steps as if hurrying forward, and reduced swinging of the arms. They also may have trouble initiating or continuing movement.

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    How Is Parkinsons Diagnosed

    Doctors use your medical history and physical examination to diagnose Parkinson’s disease . No blood test, brain scan or other test can be used to make a definitive diagnosis of PD.

    Researchers believe that in most people, Parkinson’s is caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Certain environmental exposures, such as pesticides and head injury, are associated with an increased risk of PD. Still, most people have no clear exposure that doctors can point to as a straightforward cause. The same goes for genetics. Certain genetic mutations are linked to an increased risk of PD. But in the vast majority of people, Parkinsons is not directly related to a single genetic mutation. Learning more about the genetics of Parkinsons is one of our best chances to understand more about the disease and discover how to slow or stop its progression.

    Aging is the greatest risk factor for Parkinsons, and the average age at diagnosis is 60. Still, some people get PD at 40 or younger.

    Men are diagnosed with Parkinsons at a higher rate than women and whites more than other races. Researchers are studying these disparities to understand more about the disease and health care access and to improve inclusivity across care and research.

    Aging is the greatest risk factor for Parkinsons, and the average age at diagnosis is 60. Still, some people get PD at 40 or younger.

    The Michael J. Fox Foundation has made finding a test for Parkinsons disease one of our top priorities.

    Im 35 With Two Young Children And Parkinsons

    Slide Show

    At 29, Ellie Finch Hulme was diagnosed with a condition often associated with much older people – Parkinson’s disease. She decided it wasn’t going to stop her living her life the way she wanted to.

    Ellie doesn’t fit the stereotype of someone with Parkinson’s disease, as one of her recent tweets makes clear.

    One 35-year-oldTwo kids, aged 4 and 2Three different medicationsFive years living with #parkinsonsAnd I don’t even look like your neighbour’s friend’s gran.

    People are often shocked when they meet her for the first time, she says.

    “I volunteer in a local charity shop occasionally around the kids and around my work and if I’m trembling, if I have to wrap something up – because anything can set off your tremor – someone will say something like, ‘Is it your first day here?’ And I’ll be like, ‘No, I’ve got Parkinson’s.'”

    They expect someone with Parkinson’s to be white-haired and stooping, but Ellie, who lives in Farnham in Surrey, has young onset Parkinson’s disease, and was diagnosed before she was 30.

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    Signs It Might Be Multiple System Atrophy Instead Of Parkinsons Disease

    Here are some clues as to whether it is multiple system atrophy or Parkinsons disease. One of the easier distinctions is between PD and MSA-C .If the patient presents with unsteadiness while walking, uncoordinated arms and legs, bladder disturbance and/or dizziness when standing the diagnosis is more likely to be MSA-C. On the other hand, if a person looks Parkinsonian the distinction can be harder, but there are clues:

    • In the earlier stages of MSA-P , which is often when people have just been told they have Parkinsons disease, some patients will fall often.Frequent falls also occur in Parkinsons disease, but it typically occurs 10-15 years after diagnosis.
    • In patients with MSA the classic Parkinsons drug L-Dopa may work initially but will stop working very quickly.It can continue working in PD patients for many years.
    • Dementia is not associated with MSA however, it does occur in patients with lewy body Parkinsons disease.
    • Early autonomic nervous system symptoms such as low blood pressure when standing and issues with the bladder are often signs of possible MSA in patients diagnosed with Parkinsons.
    • Vocal cord issues are less common but very typical in MSA and much less common in PD.Some examples include difficulty getting words out, odd sighs and even falling asleep during a conversation.

    Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms Everyone Should Know

    Parkinsons disease symptoms can include tremor and trouble with movement, along with emotional and cognitive changes.

    Parkinson’s disease symptoms can vary significantly from person to person. Some people may have range of motor symptoms, like tremor, stiffness, and slow movements. Others may also experience the non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, such as anxiety, cognitive changes, and loss of smell.

    It has to do with a chemical messenger known as dopamine, which plays a role in the brain’s ability to control movement, coordination, and emotional responses. In Parkinson’s disease, the brain cells that produce dopamine either stop doing their job or they die out, resulting in both motor and non-motor symptoms. It’s not always easy to tell if someone you care about has Parkinson’s disease. Let’s take a closer look at the symptoms of the disease and signs that someone should make an appointment with their doctor.

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    What Should Others Be Aware Of When Interacting With Me

    My tremor is the most visible symptom. If you see my hand or arm shaking, understand this is a “normal” symptom and there is no need for concern. What may be less obvious is the impact PD has on my facial expressions. The symptoms sometimes pull my face into a frown, so please don’t think I’m scowling, angry, or upset. I noticed that it’s harder to work the muscles on the left side of my face, so you may notice what looks an arched eyebrow or half-grin. This is probably me expressing astonishment or just trying to smile. PD also causes me to speak more softly, and often I’m not aware. It’s perfectly fine to let me know you are having trouble hearing me because I can speak louder if I focus.

    Due to challenges with typing, I always prefer a voice chat over a text-based one.

    The head tracker that I use requires me to wear a silver dot on my forehead or glasses.

    Memory Or Thinking Problems

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    Having issues with thinking and processing things could mean your disease is progressing. Parkinsons is more than a movement disorder. The disease has a cognitive part as well, which means it can cause changes in the way your brain works.

    During the final stage of the disease, some people may develop dementia or have hallucinations. However, hallucinations can also be a side effect of certain medications.

    If you or your loved ones notice that youre getting unusually forgetful or easily confused, it might be a sign of advanced-stage Parkinsons.

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    Parkinson’s Disease Is Only Seen In People Of Advanced Age

    Parkinson’s disease isn’t just seen in people of advanced age. While it does tend to affect people over age 60 more often, in about 5% to 10% of cases, “early onset” PD can begin in people as young as age 40. The progression of PD is different for everyone, however, those who develop it at earlier ages seem to have a more severe progression. Life expectancy for people with Parkinson’s disease is about the same as the average population, but complications from the disease in the later stages can lead to fatal outcomes from choking, pneumonia, and falling.

    What Are The Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

    The main symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are:

    • tremor or shaking, often when resting or tired. It usually begins in one arm or hand
    • muscle rigidity or stiffness, which can limit movement and may be painful
    • slowing of movement, which may lead to periods of freezing and small shuffling steps
    • stooped posture and balance problems

    The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease vary from person to person as well as over time. Some people also experience:

    • loss of unconscious movements, such as blinking and smiling
    • difficulties with handwriting
    • drop in blood pressure leading to dizziness
    • difficulty swallowing
    • sweating

    Many of the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease could be caused by other conditions. For example, stooped posture could be caused by osteoporosis. But if you are worried by your symptoms, it is a good idea to see your doctor.

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    Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

    The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease usually develop gradually and are mild at first.

    There are many different symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease. Some of the more common symptoms are described below.

    However, the order in which these develop and their severity is different for each individual. It’s unlikely that a person with Parkinson’s disease would experience all or most of these.

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