Sunday, August 14, 2022

Parkinson’s Disease For Dummies

Living With Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s Disease, Animation

As Parkinson’s develops, a person who has it may slow down and won’t be able to move or talk quickly. Sometimes, speech therapy and occupational therapy are needed. This may sound silly, but someone who has Parkinson’s disease may need to learn how to fall down safely.

If getting dressed is hard for a person with Parkinson’s, clothing with Velcro and elastic can be easier to use than buttons and zippers. The person also might need to have railings installed around the house to prevent falls.

If you know someone who has Parkinson’s disease, you can help by being a good friend.

Recent Comments Of Parkinson’s Disease For Dummies

Brittney

Justyna

Emily May

C.G. Drews

Chloe

The Art of Star Wars: The Mandalorian Flowers for AlgernonSouls: A Killers Novel, Book 6 Tell Me This Is Forever: The British BillionairesSledgehammer: How Breaking with the Past Brought Peace to the Middle EastMr. DeMaio Presents!: The Biggest Stuff in the Universe: Based on the Hit YouTube Series!Last Resort On The Coast Elric of Melniboné: The Elric Saga Part 1 AP Biology Premium, 2022-2023: 5 Practice Tests + Comprehensive Review + Online Practice Seraph of the End, Vol. 23: Vampire Reign AP World History: Modern Premium, 2022-2023: 5 Practice Tests + Comprehensive Review + Online Practice Reborn as a Barrier Master Vol. 2Mask of Death Domestic Animals The Country Cottage: A Prairie Creek Romance Black Men in Science: A Black History Book for Kids THE INVASION OF LUSTER Destiny: Valentine’s on Emerald MountainThe Lake Vyrnwy Killings: A DI Ruth Hunter Crime Thriller Book 11

Premium Member Only

What Causes Parkinson’s Disease

In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia . In a person with Parkinson’s disease, these nerve cells are damaged and do not work as well as they should.

These nerve cells make and use a brain chemical called dopamine to send messages to other parts of the brain to coordinate body movements. When someone has Parkinson’s disease, dopamine levels are low. So, the body doesn’t get the right messages it needs to move normally.

Experts agree that low dopamine levels in the brain cause the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, but no one really knows why the nerve cells that produce dopamine get damaged and die.

p

Recommended Reading: Yopd Life Expectancy

How Is Parkinson’s Disease Diagnosed

Someone with the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease may be sent to see a neurologist, a doctor who specializes in the brain, nerves, and muscles. The neurologist may do some tests, including a brain scan and blood tests. These tests will not make the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, but the doctor will want to make sure that there is no other problem causing the symptoms. To diagnose Parkinson’s disease, the doctor relies on a person’s medical history, symptoms, and a physical exam.

Who Gets Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson

About 1 million people in the United States have Parkinson’s disease, and both men and women can get it. Symptoms usually appear when someone is older than 50 and it becomes more common as people get older.

Many people wonder if you’re more likely to get Parkinson’s disease if you have a relative who has it. Although the role that heredity plays isn’t completely understood, we do know that if a close relative like a parent, brother, or sister has Parkinson’s, there is a greater chance of developing the disease. But Parkinson’s disease is not contagious. You can’t get it by simply being around someone who has it.

Don’t Miss: Weighted Silverware

How Is Parkinson’s Disease Treated

If a doctor thinks a person has Parkinson’s disease, there’s reason for hope. Medicine can be used to eliminate or improve the symptoms, like the body tremors. And some experts think that a cure may be found soon.

For now, a medicine called levodopa is often given to people who have Parkinson’s disease. Called “L-dopa,” this medicine increases the amount of dopamine in the body and has been shown to improve a person’s ability to walk and move around. Other drugs also help decrease and manage the symptoms by affecting dopamine levels. In some cases, surgery may be needed to treat it. The person would get anesthesia, a special kind of medicine to prevent pain during the operation.

What Are The Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include tremors or trembling difficulty maintaining balance and coordination trouble standing or walking stiffness and general slowness.

Over time, a person with Parkinson’s may have trouble smiling, talking, or swallowing. Their faces may appear flat and without expression, but people with Parkinson’s continue to have feelings even though their faces don’t always show it. Sometimes people with the disease can have trouble with thinking and remembering too.

Because of problems with balance, some people with Parkinson’s fall down a lot, which can result in broken bones. Some people with Parkinson’s may also feel sad or depressed and lose interest in the things they used to do.

The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease appear gradually and get worse over time. But because Parkinson’s disease usually develops slowly, most people who have it can live a long and relatively healthy life.

You May Like: Similar To Parkinsons

Suchaj I Czytaj Za Darmo Przez 7dni

Korzystaj bez ograniczeÅ z możliwoÅci jakie oferuje Storytel przez 7 dni kompletnie za darmo

Wendy Tremont King
Audiobook

If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease you’re probably wrestling with fear, despair, and countless questions about the future. It’s brighter than you think. In Parkinson’s Disease for Dummies, you’ll discover how to keep a positive attitude and lead an active, productive life as this user-friendly, guide pilots you through the important steps toward taking charge of your condition. It helps you:

â Make sure you have an accurate diagnosis

â Assemble and work with your health care team

â Inform others about your condition

â Choose the most effective medications

â And more

This one-stop resource provides proven coping skills, first-hand advice, and practical tools, such as worksheets to assess care options, questions to ask doctors, and current listings of care providers.

JÄzyk:

Popular Articles
Related news