Thursday, July 28, 2022

Best Place To Live With Parkinson’s Disease

Rural Northern Indians Have Low Rates Of Alzheimers

Top Tips from Living with Parkinsons Disease and Dr. Michael S. Okun: Part 2

While more than 5 percent of adults older than 65 are affected by Alzheimers disease in the United States, an area in rural northern India has a rate of only 1 percent. While its possible that this extremely low percentage is the product of poor diagnostic methods or genetics, other explanations come from Dr. Andrew Weil, who has suggested the liberal use of turmeric in the diet may have a role and Dr. Michael McGregor, who notes that the diet of this population is high in carbohydrates, grains, fats, and beans and low in meat.

Other Causes Of Parkinsonism

“Parkinsonism” is the umbrella term used to describe the symptoms of tremors, muscle rigidity and slowness of movement.

Parkinson’s disease is the most common type of parkinsonism, but there are also some rarer types where a specific cause can be identified.

These include parkinsonism caused by:

  • medication where symptoms develop after taking certain medications, such as some types of antipsychotic medication, and usually improve once the medication is stopped
  • other progressive brain conditions such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple systems atrophy, and corticobasal degeneration
  • cerebrovascular disease where a series of small strokes cause several parts of the brain to die

You can read more about parkinsonism on the Parkinson’s UK website.

Faith Helps And Gives People Hope

Nearly 50 percent of survey participants said their faith or spirituality is a big part of how they stay positive.

My positive attitude comes from knowing that God loves me and has me in the palm of his hand. This perspective keeps me looking ahead and lightens my spirit.

One with Parkinsons disease needs to think positively about their disease. I am a spiritual person who turns over my disease to a higher power. I stay informed about my disease. I enjoy reading about how others stay positive.

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Parkinsons Movement Disorder And Alliance

Key Specs

  • Membership fee: Free
  • Structure:In-person support groups, virtual Zoom support groups, chat forums/message boards
  • Details: Offers both in-person and virtual support groups, educational videos and resources, and support is available for care partners
  • Things to do: A survey needs to be completed first before you can participate in the online community

The Parkinsons Movement Disorder and Alliance is a nonprofit organization that focuses on characteristics like empathy, creativity, resiliency, and shared learning.

It also has a wealth of support and educational services. Aside from online programming and Zoom support groups, this organization also offers various in-person support groups located throughout the country.

Additionally, the organization features numerous educational programs like “Lunch with Docs,” in which individuals can meet with a movement disorder specialist virtually over lunch from the comfort of their own home.

There are free workshops across the country called In Sync for supporting and teaching people interested in developing their skills as a support group leader.

There, people can learn skills and build confidence in designing and leading their own support group for Parkinsons disease or other movement disorders. Leadership experts and healthcare professionals also provide guidance through informational presentations.

Karl Robb Provides Practical Tips For Safe And Comfortable Travels

Parkinson

From the train ticket collector who wanted proof of my Parkinson’s disease to the airport security ladies who laughed at the way I was moving, I have certainly experienced my share of frustrations while traveling. Even so, it is the fellow travelers who reached out to lend me a hand that I remember most.

I am not ashamed of being a person with Parkinson’s disease. So when I travel, I don’t hide. But there was a time, in my early twenties, when I would not tell people I had Parkinson’s. Now in my forties, I feel a responsibility to educate everyone who has an interest in this illness.

Traveling these days, whether you have a physical challenge or not, can be a hassle, but there are ways to make the time away more enjoyable, safer, and less stressful. Here is a list of helpful tips that I hope will make you and your travel companions more comfortable on your next vacation.

Create a checklist. Following a good list will help you be prepared and not be over packed.

Start packing early. Packing ahead of schedule will allow you to relax and feel less rushed the day you leave. Make sure that the clothes you want to wear are ready and all the items you want to bring are easily accessible.

Choose comfort over fashion. Pack comfortable clothes and walking shoes that will allow you to move freely. Your mobility and flexibility should be a priority when you are on the go.

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What Are The Different Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

Each person with Parkinsons disease experiences symptoms in in their own unique way. Not everyone experiences all symptoms of Parkinsons disease. You may not experience symptoms in the same order as others. Some people may have mild symptoms others may have intense symptoms. How quickly symptoms worsen also varies from individual to individual and is difficult to impossible to predict at the outset.

In general, the disease progresses from early stage to mid-stage to mid-late-stage to advanced stage. This is what typically occurs during each of these stages:

Early stage

Early symptoms of Parkinsons disease are usually mild and typically occur slowly and do not interfere with daily activities. Sometimes early symptoms are not easy to detect or you may think early symptoms are simply normal signs of aging. You may have fatigue or a general sense of uneasiness. You may feel a slight tremor or have difficulty standing.

Often, a family member or friend notices some of the subtle signs before you do. They may notice things like body stiffness or lack of normal movement slow or small handwriting, lack of expression in your face, or difficulty getting out of a chair.

Mid stage

Mid-late stage

Standing and walking are becoming more difficult and may require assistance with a walker. You may need full time help to continue to live at home.

Advanced stage

Incidence Of Parkinsons Disease

Its estimated that approximately four people per 1,000 in Australia have Parkinsons disease, with the incidence increasing to one in 100 over the age of 60. In Australia, there are approximately 80,000 people living with Parkinsons disease, with one in five of these people being diagnosed before the age of 50. In Victoria, more than 2,225 people are newly diagnosed with Parkinsons every year.

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Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

The type, number, severity and progression of Parkinsons disease symptoms vary greatly. Every person is affected differently they may not get every symptom.

Some of the more common symptoms are:

  • resting tremor
  • rigidity
  • blood pressure fluctuation
  • constipation.

People living with Parkinsons for some time may experience hallucinations , paranoia and delusions . These symptoms are able to be treated so have a talk with your doctor.

Looking After Your Financial And Legal Affairs And Knowing Your Entitlements

Hal Pottle living with Parkinson’s

Having Parkinsons may affect you financially for a number of reasons, if, for example you have to stop working or need additional care. It is important to plan for your future sooner rather than later in order to compensate for any financial hardships. You may be legally entitled to certain benefits, so speak to your healthcare professionals, local benefit offices or others in the same situation as you for tips and advice.

See also Legal and financial.

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Changing The Mindset About Parkinsons

When asked about their quality of life, 65 percent of respondents said they have accepted their diagnosis/prognosis. They shared that having the right mindset helps them navigate their disease.

It is not the end of the world. Enjoy what you CAN do. Have a sense of humor. Laugh.

There are worse things. Seek and employ humor. Exercise.

Caring For Someone With Parkinsons Disease

Caring for someone with Parkinsons disease will change as the condition progresses.Your loved one is likely to cope well on their own during the early stages, and may only require transportation to doctors appointments, social engagements, and shopping trips. But their dependence will inevitably grow, and at some point, they may need your help with daily personal tasks, medication management, making financial decisions, and advocating with healthcare providers on their behalf.

Parkinsons disease places a significant burden on family caregivers, and they tend to suffer from higher rates of anxiety, depression, and sleep-related problems. These issues are even more common when Parkinsons disease causes a loved one to experience dementia, hallucinations, and other cognitive issues.

Caring for someone with Parkinsons disease can also result in social isolation, especially once the disorder reaches advanced stages. In some cases, caregivers reported that their increasing responsibilities led to tension with a spouse or partner. They were also more likely to report financial strain, especially if they reduced work hours or left their jobs entirely because of caregiving obligations.

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Treatments For Parkinson’s Disease

Although PD has no cure, the symptoms of the disease are treatable.

Because each patient experiences symptoms differently, physicians base each patients treatments on his or her specific symptoms. The Movement Disorders team works closely with other UT Southwestern specialists such as those in psychiatry and speech, physical, and occupational therapy to provide patients with individualized care to manage symptoms and maximize mobility, balance, and coordination.

Treatments for Parkinsons disease include:

  • Medication: Many experts now believe that medication should be initiated immediately after diagnosis. Medication can help manage problems with walking, movement, and tremor by correcting or compensating for dopamine deficiency in the brain.
  • Botulinum toxin injection: UT Southwestern specializes in the use of botulinum toxin injections for a variety of conditions that result in involuntary muscle contractions. Botulinum toxin weakens the muscle that it is injected into, thus promoting relaxation of muscle spasm. These injections can be a particularly effective treatment for PD patients with dystonia , eye twitching, and drooling. Patients who might benefit from botulinum toxin are examined to determine which muscles are overactive. The botulinum toxin is injected into only those muscles. Benefits gradually develop over seven to 10 days. The treatment is usually effective for three months, so injections are repeated several times a year to maintain ongoing benefits.

How Is A Diagnosis Made

The 7 Best Parkinson

Because other conditions and medications mimic the symptoms of PD, getting an accurate diagnosis from a physician is important. No single test can confirm a diagnosis of PD, because the symptoms vary from person to person. A thorough history and physical exam should be enough for a diagnosis to be made. Other conditions that have Parkinsons-like symptoms include Parkinsons plus, essential tremor, progressive supranuclear palsy, multi-system atrophy, dystonia, and normal pressure hydrocephalus.

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If You Have Parkinson’s Disease

If you have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s, call your doctor if:

  • You notice any significant change in your symptoms, such as severe episodes of freezingâa sudden loss of mobilityâwhich may affect walking.
  • Your response to your medicine changes.
  • Any other symptoms occur, such as constipation, sexual problems, or incontinence.
  • You have symptoms of depression, such as feeling sad or hopeless and losing interest in daily activities.
  • You or your family notice that you have problems with memory and thinking ability.

Paying For Parkinsons Disease Care In Assisted Living

While actively searching for a suitable assisted living facility for a patient with Parkinsons disease, it is essential to make sure that you can afford it. It may not come cheap thus, one must have savings or other investments to pay out of pocket for the care without draining themselves financially. Senior citizens with Parkinsons and their families may end up paying about $4,500 or more a month for assisted living, depending on the retirement community.

Older adults who have limited financial resources can benefit from Medicaid to help with expenses for Parkinsons disease care. Even though this option typically does not cover costs in assisted living, many states provide financial aid to patients who cannot afford it. Eligibility, however, varies in different states. Contact the local department of social or human services to find out if you or a loved one qualifies. Keep in mind that some state programs will only cover specific costs and medical illness. Additionally, not all retirement communities accept Medicaid candidates and Medicare is usually not an option, as it does not take care of assisted living costs.

An alternative solution that may work out well for older adults with Parkinsons is to have long-term insurance. Parkinsons patients can use long-term care insurance to cover their senior living expenses in assisted living. Be sure to confirm coverage by carefully going through the contractual information and the fine print.

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Fall Prevention In Parkinsons Assisted Retirement Communities

Assisted living residences that specialize in taking care of Parkinsons disease patients usually put in place the necessary modifications that prevent aging individuals from falling as they go about their daily activities. They design their residences to have open pathways with no obstacles so that inhabitants who use walkers, canes, or wheelchairs can move around with ease. Many communities also include grab bars beside tubs, sinks and toilets so that occupants are safe and do not trip or fall.

Sardinia Has The Highest Rate Of 100 Year

Parkinson Place Members Speak Out

This category is a little different: death before age 100. On the Italian island of Sardinia , the approximately 1.6 million inhabitants have the worlds highest documented percentage of people who have lived longer than 100 years. The secret is likely a combination of diet , lifestyle , and genetics. In fact, a research team discovered a gene in the Y chromosome that can significantly reduce the risk of stroke and heart attack in men in Sardinia.

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Foster A Good Relationship

Lastly, maintaining your relationship and communication with the person with Parkinsonâs can be the most challenging and rewarding aspect of caregiving. As Parkinsonâs disease progresses, the roles change and the person with Parkinsonâs may go from being an independent head of the household to a very dependent person requiring a significant level of care. However, research shows that despite high levels of strain, caregivers with good quality relationships have reduced depression and better physical health. Remember, as a caregiver your service to your loved one is beyond measure in terms of love, depth of care, and concern.

Copper Canyon Mexico Residents Dont Have High Cholesterol

High cholesterol is an important risk factor for the number one killer in the United States: heart disease. The percentage of US adults with high cholesterol is 12.9 percent and those with high bad cholesterol is 31 to 32 percent. Yet among the Tarahumara Indians in Mexicos Copper Canyon region, high cholesterol and heart disease are nearly nonexistent. This benefit is likely associated with their diet, which is extremely low in cholesterol and saturated fat, and consists mainly of native foods, such as whole corn, beans, pinole, tortillas, cumin, and squash.

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Dailystrength Parkinsons Disease Support Group

Key Specs

  • Details: Easy-to-use interface, small and intimate support group, and provides access to doctors
  • Things to consider: It’s not a very active group

The DailyStrength Parkinsons Disease Support Group is a free and welcoming online support community with more than 400 members and 3,000 posts.

The mission of the group is centered around empowering and inspiring each other to overcome PD-related and life challenges.

Overall, the DailyStrength website is easy to navigate, and registration is straightforward and quick. Posts are informational, practical, and thoughtful. This is, perhaps, a good place to start for people looking for a smaller, more intimate online support group that is not overwhelming or associated with a national organization.

Even though the site is not moderated, to keep the support group safe and positive, DailyStrength has a set of guidelines that the members are asked to follow.

How Do I Prevent Falls From Common Hazards

Pin on Parkinsons
  • Floors: Remove all loose wires, cords, and throw rugs. Minimize clutter. Make sure rugs are anchored and smooth. Keep furniture in its usual place.
  • Bathroom: Install grab bars and non-skid tape in the tub or shower. Use non-skid bath mats on the floor or install wall-to-wall carpeting.
  • Lighting: Make sure halls, stairways, and entrances are well-lit. Install a night light in your bathroom or hallway and staircase. Turn lights on if you get up in the middle of the night. Make sure lamps or light switches are within reach of the bed if you have to get up during the night.
  • Kitchen: Install non-skid rubber mats near the sink and stove. Clean spills immediately.
  • Stairs: Make sure treads, rails, and rugs are secure. Install a rail on both sides of the stairs. If stairs are a threat, it might be helpful to arrange most of your activities on the lower level to reduce the number of times you must climb the stairs.
  • Entrances and doorways: Install metal handles on the walls adjacent to the doorknobs of all doors to make it more secure as you travel through the doorway.

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Medication And Health Care Questions

  • What is the residence policy regarding storage of medication, assistance with medications, and medication record-keeping?
  • Is self-administration of medication allowed?
  • Who coordinates visits from a nurse, physical therapist, occupational therapist, or other specialist if needed?
  • Does a doctor or nurse visit the resident regularly to provide medical checkups?

What Lifestyle Changes Can I Make To Ease Parkinsons Symptoms

Exercise: Exercise helps improve muscle strength, balance, coordination, flexibility, and tremor. It is also strongly believed to improve memory, thinking and reduce the risk of falls and decrease anxiety and depression. One study in persons with Parkinsons disease showed that 2.5 hours of exercise per week resulted in improved ability to move and a slower decline in quality of life compared to those who didnt exercise or didnt start until later in the course of their disease. Some exercises to consider include strengthening or resistance training, stretching exercises or aerobics . All types of exercise are helpful.

Eat a healthy, balanced diet: This is not only good for your general health but can ease some of the non-movement related symptoms of Parkinsons, such as constipation. Eating foods high in fiber in particular can relieve constipation. The Mediterranean diet is one example of a healthy diet.

Preventing falls and maintaining balance: Falls are a frequent complication of Parkinson’s. While you can do many things to reduce your risk of falling, the two most important are: 1) to work with your doctor to ensure that your treatments whether medicines or deep brain stimulation are optimal and 2) to consult with a physical therapist who can assess your walking and balance. The physical therapist is the expert when it comes to recommending assistive devices or exercise to improve safety and preventing falls.

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