Wednesday, November 30, 2022

Pedaling For Parkinson’s Ymca

Building Strength To Thrive

Pedal for Parkinson’s

Group cycling and support help participants reduce symptoms in Parkinsons disease sufferers and improve the quality of life of patients and their caregivers. Eligible adults aged 3075 with a Parkinsons diagnosis ride indoor cycles at 8090 RPM, three times per week, 60 minutes each session, over the course of at least eight weeks . YMCA staff are trained by certified indoor cycling instructors following the Pedaling for Parkinsons protocol and monitor heart rate and exercise frequency.

More than one million Americans are living with Parkinsons disease and nearly 60,000 new diagnoses occur each year. There is no known cure, and the risk of developing Parkinsons disease increases with age. Pedaling for Parkinsons uses group cycling and support to reduce symptoms in Parkinsons disease suffers and improve the quality of life of patients and their caregivers.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Parkinsons disease clinical diagnosis
  • Medical clearance
  • YMCA membership not required

Note: Patients also suffering from dementia, cardio or pulmonary disease, uncontrolled diabetes, uncontrolled hypertension or stroke ineligible for the study.

Pedaling For Parkinson’s Mission

The mission of Pedaling for Parkinson’s is:

  • To improve the quality of life of Parkinson’s disease patients and their caregivers
  • To educate patients, caregivers, and the general public about the benefits of maintaining an active lifestyle after a Parkinson’s diagnosis.
  • To support research dedicated to the prevention and treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

Pedaling For Parkinsons Mission

The mission of Pedaling for Parkinsons is:

  • To improve the quality of life of Parkinsons disease patients and their caregivers.
  • To educate patients, caregivers, and the general public about the benefits of maintaining an active lifestyle after a Parkinsons diagnosis.
  • To support research dedicated to the prevention and treatment of Parkinsons disease.

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Stay Strong Keep Moving

Over 1 million people in the U.S. live with Parkinsons Disease, with approximately 60,000 Americans diagnosed each year. Many people are able to reduce or delay symptoms of the disease through regular exercise and therapy.

The YMCA offers a variety of classes and programs to help people with Parkinsons stay strong and keep moving, :

This innovative class is based on studies that show that forced exercise on a stationary bike riding at a set speed three times a week can reduce Parkinsons Disease symptoms by as much as 35%.

Focusing on interval training, building strength and endurance, and bolstering cognitive and voice skills, this high-intensity class helps people with Parkinsons Disease reduce or delay their symptoms.

The Parkinsons in Motion class focuses on cognitive components and voice skills to help people with Parkinsons Disease in their everyday living.

Pedaling For Parkinsons Program

Bayside YMCA poised to pedal for Parkinson

Pedaling a bicycle at a rapid pace may change the life of someone living with Parkinsons disease. Research conducted at the Cleveland Clinic found that patients can experience a 35 percent reduction in symptoms by riding an indoor, stationary bicycle for one hour three days a week. While cycling is not a cure for Parkinsons disease, there is compelling evidence to show that it does make a real difference for many who try it. Classes are designed to empower participants by optimizing their physical function, improving their gait, balance, speech, handwriting, and overall endurance, and helping to delay the progression of symptoms.

Pilot Program- Launching Fall 2021

Days:

Recommended Reading: Cleveland Clinic Parkinson’s Bicycle Study 2017

A Wellness Recovery Program

Research conducted at the Cleveland Clinic showed a 35% reduction in Parkinsons patient symptoms by the simple act of pedaling a bicycle at a rapid pace optimally 80-90 revolution per minute. Pedaling is not a cure for Parkinsons disease and should not be touted as such, but there is compelling evidence to show that it does make a real difference for many.

If you are interested in finding out more about Pedaling 4 Parkinsons or would like to participate, please contact our Pickens YMCA.

Reduce Your Symptoms Be In Community

Pedaling a bicycle may change the life of someone with Parkinsons disease. Research conducted at the Cleveland Clinic showed a 35% reduction in symptoms by the simple act of pedaling a bicycle at a rapid pace optimally, 80-90 revolutions per minute. Fast pedaling is not a cure for Parkinsons disease, but there is compelling evidence to show that it does make a real difference in many who try it.

Pedaling for Parkinson’s Mission

The mission of Pedaling for Parkinson’s is:

  • To improve the quality of life of Parkinson’s disease patients and their caregivers
  • To educate patients, caregivers, and the general public about the benefits of maintaining an active lifestyle after a Parkinson’s diagnosis.
  • To support research dedicated to the prevention and treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

Program Requirements:

  • Be over the age of 30
  • Be diagnosed with Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease
  • Complete and submit consent and medical clearance form
  • NOT have cardiac or pulmonary disease, uncontrolled mellitus, uncontrolled hypertension or stroke, dementia, other medical conditions for which exercise poses a risk.

Program Cost:

Pedaling for Parkinson’s is FREE for SRYMCA members who meet the requirements. If you are not an active SRYMCA member, there is a $5 per class charge.

Contact Us:

Fore more information, or to register, please call 518-583-9622.

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What Is Parkinsons

Parkinsons disease is caused by a breakdown in the nerve cells in the brain. The affected nerve cells do not produce enough dopamine, which affects your ability to move the way you want. Tremors, stiff muscles, slow movement, and trouble with balance or walking are all symptoms of Parkinsons disease.

In time, Parkinsons affects muscles throughout the body, leading to difficulty with swallowing, digestion, facial movements and more.

How It Started

Pedaling For Parkinson’s

In 2003, Jay Alberts, Ph.D. was doing research on Deep Brain Stimulation for PD patients. An avid cyclist who grew up in Iowa, Dr. Alberts convinced six cycling friends to join him for the Registers Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa . One friend was accompanied by his wife who has PD. The couple started on the week long tour on a tandem bike. It was an instant disaster. Dr. Alberts took his friends place on the front of the bike, pedaling at his typical 80-90 rpm cadence. After a few days, the woman said she no longer felt as though she had PD. Also, her handwriting, impaired by PD, was markedly improved.

His curiosity piqued, Dr. Alberts researched the effects of fast-paced cycling on 12 PD patents. Six rode on solo stationary bikes at their normal cadence of about 55 rpm, keeping their heart rates at 60-85 percent of maximum. Six rode on the backs of tandem cycles at a pace of 80-90 rpm within the same heart rate range. For eight weeks, each rode three hourly sessions per week with 10 minutes of warm up, 40 minutes at cadence and 10 minutes of cool down. At the end of eight weeks, the patients on solo bikes had no measurable change in PD. Those on tandems had an average of 35 percent reduction in symptoms. A month after stopping, the tandem patients still retained some benefits.

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